Article of the Day: Seven Rules for Drafting a Highly Effective Quarterback

Below is a great article about evaluation. This article was written by Michael Lombardi who was previously an executive to the New England Patriots staff. There are a ton of great things in this article. Evaluating a QB for a football team and the traits they look for isn’t much different than evaluating a PG in regards to the traits we as coaches look for.

“The hardest thing to do in football is to find coaches that can coach the quarterback, and it’s even harder to find ones that can evaluate them.”- Bill Walsh

“Walsh believed in a simple answer: Few teams know what they are looking for in a quarterback.”

“So he flipped the paradigm: Instead of evaluating what a young QB could bring to his team, Walsh evaluated how a quarterback could excel in his West Coast offense. His cheat sheet demanded the following things: a quick-footed passer; a rhythm thrower; athletic movement; toughness; a winning pedigree; and someone who instinctively knew how to play quarterback. He scouted inside out, not outside in.

Another Hall of Fame coach created a similar cheat sheet: Bill Parcells. He wanted a three-year starter. He wanted a senior in college, someone who graduated. He wanted a player who started at least 30 games, with 23 or more wins, and at least a 2-to-1 touchdown-to-interception ratio. Finally, he wanted a 60 percent passer.”

Jeff Van Gundy once said, “Your best player has to set a tone of intolerance for anything that gets in the way of winning.”

“You cannot teach obsession; it has to come naturally.”

The Seven Rules:

  1. A Winning Pedigree
  2. The Thickest Skin
  3. Blood, Sweat, and Tears (Work Ethic)
  4. High Football IQ
  5. The Crib Factor (Instincts)
  6. Positive Body Language
  7. The Charm Factor (Good Teammate)

Link

 

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